Monthly Archives: February 2018

//February

Dais cotinifolia – Pompon tree – Kanabas

One of our best loved indigenous trees, the Dais cotinifolia is an unforgettable sight from November to December when it is covered in a cloud of soft, pink fluff balls.  The new flower buds look like lollipops, with big round heads on thin stems, carried at the end of the branches.  Once the buds burst [...]

By |2018-09-21T14:47:40+02:00February 22nd, 2018|Tree of the Week|Comments Off on Dais cotinifolia – Pompon tree – Kanabas

Ficus ingens – Red leaved rock fig – Rooiblaarvy

Ficus ingens is an indigenous tree that is found along the eastern region of South Africa, from the Eastern Cape to Limpopo, as well as in Gauteng, North West Province and Mpumalanga.  It grows in various habitats, but prefers rocky outcrops in moist or more temperate conditions. Although ‘ingens’ means large or enormous, the Red [...]

By |2018-09-21T14:47:41+02:00February 15th, 2018|Tree of the Week|Comments Off on Ficus ingens – Red leaved rock fig – Rooiblaarvy

Breonadia salicina – Matumi tree – Mingerhout

Mingerhout is the Afrikaans word for the Matumi tree, also known as the ‘Woodworkers Friend’.  The wood is hard and heavy with beautiful yellow to light brown colours, which lends itself to the making of fine furniture.  Because of the popularity of the wood for manufacturing purposes, the Matumi is now a protected tree in [...]

By |2018-02-08T14:29:14+02:00February 8th, 2018|Tree of the Week|Comments Off on Breonadia salicina – Matumi tree – Mingerhout

Quercus robur – English oak – Akkerboom

Historically, Quercus robur is one of the most well-know of all exotic species in South Africa.  Hailing from Europe, the English oak was one of the first trees to be planted by the early settlers in the Cape region as it was deemed to be suitable for providing wood for wine barrels.  The quality of [...]

By |2018-09-21T14:47:41+02:00February 1st, 2018|Tree of the Week|Comments Off on Quercus robur – English oak – Akkerboom